Data Science and Databases

Showing 113-120 of 122 results

Fixing the “Heartbleed” OpenSSL Bug: A Tutorial for Sys Admins

by Gergely Kalman

A potentially critical problem, nicknamed "Heartbleed", has surfaced in the widely-used OpenSSL cryptographic library. The vulnerability is particularly dangerous in that potentially critical data can be leaked and the attack leaves no trace. As a user, chances are that sites you frequent regularly are affected and your data may have been compromised. As a developer or sys admin, sites or servers you're responsible for are likely to have been affected. Here are the key facts you need to know about this dangerous bug and how to mitigate your vulnerability.

< 5 minute readContinue Reading

A Deep Learning Tutorial: From Perceptrons to Deep Networks

by Ivan Vasilev

The recent resurgence in Artificial Intelligence has been powered in no small part by a new trend in machine learning, known as "Deep Learning". In this article, I'll introduce you to the key concepts and algorithms behind Deep Learning, beginning with the simplest building block.

21 minute readContinue Reading

Modernizing Legacy Software: MUD Programming Using Erlang and CloudI

by Michael Truog

The need to adapt legacy code and systems to meet modern day performance and processing demands is widespread. This post provides a case study of the use of Erlang and CloudI to adapt legacy code, consisting of a decades-old collection of multi-user game software written in C, to the 21st century.

7 minute readContinue Reading

Your Boss Won't Appreciate TDD: Try This Behavior-Driven Development Example

by Ryan Wilcox

Testing. It always seems to get left to the last minute, then cut because you're out of time, budget, or whatever else. Management wonders why developers can't just "get it right the first time", and developers (especially on large systems) can be taken off-guard when different stakeholders describe different parts of the system. With behavior-driven development, you can turn testing into a shared process that focuses on the behaviors of the system, why they matter, and who cares.

8 minute readContinue Reading

Anti-Patterns in Telecommuting

by Steven S. Morgan

As a veteran telecommuter through multiple jobs in my career, I have witnessed and experienced the many joys of being a remote worker. As for the horror stories, I have more than a few I could tell. With a bit of artistic inclination and a talent for mathematics, I also have a fascination with patterns: design patterns, architectural patterns, behavioral patterns, social patterns, weather patterns—all sorts of patterns! When I first encountered anti-patterns, I discovered a trove of wisdom I wish I had known before I had learned the hard way. Anti-patterns are recognizable repeated patterns that contribute significantly to failure. For example, the manager that keeps interrupting the employee in order to see if the employee is getting any work done is engaging in an anti-pattern that serves to prevent the employee from getting any work done! Based on my own experiences and experiences of friends and co-workers, I am assembling descriptions of anti-patterns related to telecommuting.

16 minute readContinue Reading

With a Filter Bypass and Some Hexadecimal, Hacked Credit Card Numbers Are Still, Still Google-able

by Gergely Kalman

In 2007, Bennett Haselton revealed a minor hack with major implications: querying ranges of numbers on Google would return pages of sensitive information, including Credit Card numbers, Social Security numbers, and more. While Haselton's hack was addressed and patched, I was able to tweak his original technique to bypass Google's filter and return the same old dangerous results.

6 minute readContinue Reading

The Trie Data Structure: A Neglected Gem

by Anna-Chiara Bellini

From the very first days in our lives as programmers, we've all dealt with data structures: Arrays, linked lists, trees, sets, stacks and queues are our everyday companions, and the experienced programmer knows when and why to use them. In this article we'll see how an oft-neglected data structure, the trie, really shines in application domains with specific features, like word games.

9 minute readContinue Reading

Scaling Play! to Thousands of Concurrent Requests

by Paulo "JCranky" Siqueira

Web Developers often fail to consider the consequences of thousands of users accessing our applications at the same time. Perhaps it's because we love to rapidly prototype; perhaps it's because testing such scenarios is simply hard. Regardless, I'm going to argue that ignoring scalability is not as bad as it sounds—if you use the proper set of tools and follow good development practices. In this case: the Play! framework and the Scala language.

5 minute readContinue Reading

Join the Toptal® community.