Ruby

Showing 28-35 of 35 results
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Buggy Rails Code: The 10 Most Common Mistakes That Rails Developers Make

by Brian VanLoo

While Rails is easy to use, it is also not hard to misuse. This article looks at 10 common Rails pitfalls, including how to avoid them and the problems that they cause.

13 minute readContinue Reading
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Adventures in GPS Programming and Development: a Geospacial Tutorial

by Tomo Krajina

This post explores some of the more common types of GPS tracking errors to expect with low-end GPS devices, providing an understanding of what causes them as well as some approaches for correcting them. The techniques outlined can provide users of low-end GPS devices with a reasonable level of automated improvement of the accuracy of their GPS tracks.

14 minute readContinue Reading
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Elasticsearch for Ruby on Rails: A Tutorial to the Chewy Gem

by Arkadiy Zabazhanov

Elasticsearch provides a powerful, scalable tool for indexing and querying massive amounts of structured data, built on top of the Apache Lucene library. Building on the foundation of Elasticsearch and the Elasticsearch-Ruby client, we've developed and released our own improvement (and simplification) of the Elasticsearch application search architecture that also provides tighter integration with Rails. We've packaged it as a Ruby gem named Chewy. This post discusses how we accomplished this, including the technical obstacles that emerged during implementation.

12 minute readContinue Reading
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Your Boss Won't Appreciate TDD: Try This Behavior-Driven Development Example

by Ryan Wilcox

Testing. It always seems to get left to the last minute, then cut because you're out of time, budget, or whatever else. Management wonders why developers can't just "get it right the first time", and developers (especially on large systems) can be taken off-guard when different stakeholders describe different parts of the system. With behavior-driven development, you can turn testing into a shared process that focuses on the behaviors of the system, why they matter, and who cares.

8 minute readContinue Reading
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A Year Building a WebRTC Application: Lessons in Startup Engineering

by Alexandre Mondaini Calvão

I've been an Engineer at Toptal for just about one year now, working on the same project since I joined the network: Ondello, a service that connects doctors and patients over WebRTC. When I first joined Ondello, I was hired as a Senior Ruby on Rails Developer, tasked to build a service up from scratch. These days, we're a team of multiple developers working on a fairly large, complex system. With this post, I'd like to share the story behind Ondello. Specifically, I'd like to talk about: how a simple application became not-so-simple, and how our use of cutting-edge technologies posed problems I'd never considered before.

9 minute readContinue Reading
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What are the Benefits of Ruby on Rails? After Two Decades of Programming, I Use Rails

by Krešimir Bojčić

Sometimes I hear people complaining about their clients, saying that they insist on using Rails, that they've had too much Kool Aid. If they are recruiters, they almost feel sick in the stomach from perspective of having to find yet another ROR primadona. From the programmers point of view it sometimes looks like clients don't have a clue. However, I believe most clients know their options just fine and they still decide to go with Rails.

8 minute readContinue Reading
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Build Dumb, Refactor Smart: How to Massage Problems Out of Ruby on Rails Code

by Daniel Lewis

Sometimes, clients give us feature requests that we really don't like. It's not that we don't like our clients, we love our clients. It's not that we don't like the feature, most client-requested features are aligned perfectly with their business goals and income. Sometimes, the reason we don't like a feature request is that the easiest way to solve it is to write bad code, and we don't have an Elegant Solution on the top of our heads. This will throw many of us on fruitless searches through RubyToolbox, github, developer blogs, and stackoverflow looking for a gem or plugin or example code that will make us feel better about ourselves. Well, I'm here to tell you, it's okay to write bad code. Sometimes, bad code is easier to refactor into beautiful code than a poorly thought out solution implemented under a time-crunch.

7 minute readContinue Reading
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How to Work Remotely and Still Be the Best

by Ryan Wilcox

Starting a new remote gig, be it a contract project or a full-time job, can be a little intimidating if you're used to going into an office day after day. But this style of employment is growing in popularity, with some very notable companies lending it their endorsements. I've worked remotely for years now on projects of various scales and durations. With this post, I hope to enumerate some of the best practices that I've picked up for working in a variety of situations. The advice here ranges from specific recommendations for software and hardware, to tips for hitting your team's deadlines.

13 minute readContinue Reading

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