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Showing 55-63 of 66 results
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The 10 Most Common Mistakes Web Developers Make: A Tutorial for Developers

by Demir Selmanovic

Today we have thousands of digital and printed resources that provide step-by-step instructions about developing all kinds of different web applications. Development environments are "smart" enough to catch and fix many mistakes that early developers battled with regularly. There are even many different development platforms that easily turn simple static HTML pages into highly interactive applications. All of these development patterns, practices, and platforms share common ground, and they are all prone to similar mistakes caused by the very nature of web applications.

9 minute readContinue Reading
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Buggy JavaScript Code: The 10 Most Common Mistakes JavaScript Developers Make

by Ryan J. Peterson

At first blush, JavaScript may seem quite simple. Yet the language is significantly more nuanced, powerful, and complex than one would initially be lead to believe. Many of JavaScript's subtleties lead to a number of common mistakes -- 10 of which we discuss here -- that are important to be aware of and avoid in one's quest to become a master JavaScript developer.

13 minute readContinue Reading
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Buggy PHP Code: The 10 Most Common Mistakes PHP Developers Make

by Ilya Sanosian

PHP makes it relatively easy to build a web-based system, which is much of the reason for its popularity. But its ease of use notwithstanding, PHP has evolved into quite a sophisticated language, with many nuances and subtleties that can bite developers, leading to hours of hair-pulling debugging. This article highlights ten of the more common mistakes that PHP developers need to beware of.

17 minute readContinue Reading
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5 Golden Rules for Great Web API Design

by Jordan Ambra

Web services and their APIs abound. Unfortunately, the vast majority are difficult to use. Reasons range from poor design, to lack of documentation, to volatility, to unresolved bugs, or in some cases, all of the above. Follow the guidance in this post to help ensure that your web API is clean, well-documented, and easy-to-use. Such APIs are truly rare and are therefore much more likely to be widely adopted and used.

12 minute readContinue Reading
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10 Most Common Web Security Vulnerabilities

by Gergely Kalman

For all too many companies, it's not until after a breach has occurred that security becomes a priority. An effective approach to IT security must, by definition, be proactive and defensive. This post focuses on 10 common and significant web-related IT security pitfalls to be aware of, including recommendations on how they can be avoided.

12 minute readContinue Reading
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Django, Flask, and Redis Tutorial: Web Application Session Management Between Python Frameworks

by Denis Kyorov

I love and use Django in lots of my personal and client projects, mostly for those involving relational databases and more classical web applications. However, by design, Django is very tightly coupled with its ORM, Template Engine System, and Settings object. Plus, it's not a new project: it carries a lot of baggage from the past to remain backwards compatible. In a few of my client projects, we've chosen to give up on Django and use a micro framework like Flask, typically when the client wants to do some interesting stuff with the framework. At the same time, we often need user registration, login, and more, all of which is easily handled with Django. The question emerged: is Django an all-or-nothing deal? Should we drop it completely from the project, or is there a way to combine some it with the flexibility of other frameworks?

9 minute readContinue Reading
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Anti-Patterns in Telecommuting

by Steven S. Morgan

As a veteran telecommuter through multiple jobs in my career, I have witnessed and experienced the many joys of being a remote worker. As for the horror stories, I have more than a few I could tell. With a bit of artistic inclination and a talent for mathematics, I also have a fascination with patterns: design patterns, architectural patterns, behavioral patterns, social patterns, weather patterns—all sorts of patterns! When I first encountered anti-patterns, I discovered a trove of wisdom I wish I had known before I had learned the hard way. Anti-patterns are recognizable repeated patterns that contribute significantly to failure. For example, the manager that keeps interrupting the employee in order to see if the employee is getting any work done is engaging in an anti-pattern that serves to prevent the employee from getting any work done! Based on my own experiences and experiences of friends and co-workers, I am assembling descriptions of anti-patterns related to telecommuting.

16 minute readContinue Reading
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With a Filter Bypass and Some Hexadecimal, Hacked Credit Card Numbers Are Still, Still Google-able

by Gergely Kalman

In 2007, Bennett Haselton revealed a minor hack with major implications: querying ranges of numbers on Google would return pages of sensitive information, including Credit Card numbers, Social Security numbers, and more. While Haselton's hack was addressed and patched, I was able to tweak his original technique to bypass Google's filter and return the same old dangerous results.

6 minute readContinue Reading
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Introduction to Responsive Web Design: Pseudo-Elements, Media Queries, and More

by Tomislav Krnic

Nowadays, your website will be visited by a wide variety of devices: desktops with large monitors, mid-sized laptops, tablets, smartphones, and more. To achieve an optimal user experience, your site should be adjusting its layout in response to these varied devices (i.e., to their varied screen resolutions and dimensions). The process of responding to the form of the user's device is referred to as (you guessed it) responsive web design (RWD).

8 minute readContinue Reading

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